NMAT Review Tips

Saturday, December 08, 2012 Stef dela Cruz 36 Comments

A lot of aspiring doctors have stumbled upon my website while looking for NMAT review tips. That isn’t much of a surprise: there is a lot of information on just about anything that can be found online. Sadly, there isn’t much information about the National Medical Admission Test (NMAT) on the Internet.

NMAT Review Tips

I decided to write about NMAT review tips because I know that the test can be tough. The NMAT is like an IQ test and an achievement test rolled into one – you do well in the test if you have a high IQ and if you tend to be that nerd in school (like me!) who loves Math and Science. But many aspiring doctors, despite their interest in anatomy and pharmacology, don’t fare well in Math tests, hence this article.

5 NMAT Review Tips for Aspiring Doctors

As you might have already noticed in a previous article I wrote on how to get high NMAT scores, I don’t give generic tips. The info I give is based on what I went through when I took the NMAT. To new readers who might be wondering why I’m bold enough to dole out NMAT review tips, I was fortunate enough to score a 99+ percentile score. It was a humbling and exhilarating experience, one that I wish to share to inspire other students who want to go down a medical career path.

So, here are five tips. Please go over them carefully and with a grain of salt. Some of them are directly related to NMAT; others are more related to being a doctor. I hope you glean some wisdom and knowledge (yes, one is different from the other) from the tips below.

  • While reviewing for NMAT, ask yourself if you really want to become a doctor. I remember many of my peers studying for the NMAT despite the fact that they never really wanted to become a doctor. Some of my friends “had to take the NMAT” because their parents wanted them to be doctors. If this is also the case with you, please take the time to think twice. Once you’re in, there is very little space to make a U-turn. Please think twice before spending 6 years of your life trying to train for a lifetime career that you don’t even like. You owe it to yourself!
  • If you really want to be a doctor, do not ever take the NMAT unprepared. I get a lot of queries on this blog post about what happens if a person has to take the NMAT twice, thrice, or many more times. Here’s what I always say: aim to take it only when you’re ready. Do not rush it. If you take the NMAT more than twice, all your test scores will be revealed anyway. And that’s not good news if you scored 30 in your first NMAT just because you “weren’t ready”.
  • When reviewing for the NMAT, figure out what your learning style is. Your learning style might be different from your friend’s, so don’t go to Starbucks and review there with him! Are you the type who prefers to study alone at home, or do you study better when in a group? Do you like listening to lectures, or do you learn faster when you read your books? Do not just jump onto any band wagon. Make your own based on what YOU need.
  • If you have to ask me whether you should take the NMAT or not, then you’re not ready. Students have been emailing me, asking for advice on whether or not they should take the NMAT. Some say they don’t know if they’re prepared enough while others are having second thoughts about going into med school. If you have to ask me or other people, then you’re not ready! Be emotionally and mentally prepared for any career move, whether it’s about taking a simple NMAT test or enrolling in a big shot medical school. It’s your life. Don’t ever say it’s “no biggie” – and don’t let anyone tell you what to do if you have what it takes to make up your own mind.
  • While preparing for the NMAT, do not assume that being an honor student ensures a high NMAT score. Remember that the NMAT will test your comprehension of subjects that you might not have taken up before, such as calculus, trigonometry, or college physics. Also remember that the NMAT is partly an IQ test – your NMAT score will not necessarily reflect your academic achievement.
  • Before taking the NMAT, find out how it works. Learn about what NMAT scores mean. Learn about the different subjects included in the test. Lean about the statistical analysis used for the test results. These will help you make your game plan.

Dear students, please take your future seriously. When you make a decision, be sure about it; don’t make a half-hearted decision that you’ll regret later. When you take the NMAT, please make sure you really want to go into med school. And please ask yourself if being a doctor is your calling. When you are honest to yourself, you are preparing yourself for a happy future.

And when you finally decide to take the NMAT, do everything to get ready for it. If you’re reading this article, then it means you are doing your research about the NMAT - good for you! I hope these NMAT review tips serve you well. Once you’re done taking the test, sit back, relax, and read about how to find out if you passed the NMAT. May the force be with you! Oh, and if you do pass, let me know! I’m on Facebook and Twitter, so do keep in touch.

Stef dela CruzAbout the blogger
Stef dela Cruz is a doctor and writer. She received the 2013 Award for Health Media from the Department of Health. She maintains a health column in Health.Care Magazine and a cat welfare column in The Manila Bulletin's Animal Scene. Add her to your circles.

36 comments:

  1. I think nobody could have said that better than you! :) Dami kasing mga premed students and graduates that keep asking whether they are ready to take the NMAT exam or not. What you've said is very true! If you want to be a med student and then a Doctor thereafter, you should always make sacrifices to be prepared and decide for yourself whether you truly are called for this profession or not. If one is truly decided, the last thing on your mind is to be doubtful because GOD is always in control if you seek His guidance and wisdom.

    Kaya I'm taking your advice to just sit back and relax until the results finally come out! :) Thanks again for your words of wisdom.. ^_^ It just makes my anxiety go away..

    ReplyDelete
  2. Do NMAT really averaged the score if taken more than twice?I doubt it,

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks, Boris! And again, good luck on your test results!

    Anonymous commenter #2, I remember filling out a form asking me how many times I took the NMAT and what my scores were. I took it only once, but my other peers had to write down all their previous test scores. (This was when I applied for med school, but I forgot which one asked for all the NMAT results. Was it UST? Or UP? I can't remember.)

    There's also supposedly a booklet of scores that is sent to all medical schools with a copy of all the test takers' scores. My classmates have seen it - but then again, that's hearsay.

    In any case, I hope that second and third takers don't lie about their previous test scores. If they can lie about NMAT, I can imagine that they'd lie about a botched-up surgery just to cover their tracks, yes?

    But I digress. Just remember that if schools want to access your NMAT scores, they can. And they probably will.

    ReplyDelete
  4. But then again, are the scores AVERAGED if a person took the NMAT more than once or is it just hearsay? From you previous reply, it doesn't really answer the question being asked.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi, Ruth! I could only hope every aspiring doctor realizes that every test he takes is recorded. Even if you don't write it down, you will be asked during the interview. "How many times did you take the NMAT? What were your scores?" Maybe schools don't get to average all scores. Maybe some look at the very first score only. Maybe some schools don't even care if you get a 50 (yes, there ARE schools like that). In the end, it DEPENDS on the school you are eyeing. Ask the school you want to enroll in! :) Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi, Sarah! I remember how some schools ask you (on paper or during interviews) about the number of times you've taken the NMAT. Some schools also ask about all your scores. In the end, it's best to ask the school you want to enroll in. Please ask them about their NMAT policies as one school's policies may differ from another's. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi there Ms. Stef! :)

    I'm an aspiring doctor as well, (psychiatrist). Good thing i was able to come across you blog yesterday & I really think it helped me & will definitely help those who wanted to be doctors someday:)

    I'm currently working and it's really hard for me to prioritize because of the demand here @ work. Right I believe naman na desidido na ko & i'm not getting any younger;). So i'm really gathering info about NMAT to help me in the test.. I've been working for two years already (i'm 22 years old :D) and been away from school for of course 2 years.. kaya i really know that i have to study again and focus talaga.. Can you suggest po some review centers that i could enroll in?.. i've tried BRAINS but theirs is expensive & it's for actually students na medyo fresh pa ung memories about sa mga pinagaralan nila & yun, again, because of work, i wasn't able to attend most of their classes.. Thank you so much Ms.Stef :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi, Sheila! Good luck on your NMAT! Unfortunately, I can't recommend a specific review center. I can't do that because I took the NMAT just once - and I didn't get the chance to try any other review center. It would be of bad taste for me to recommend a review center I haven't tried, so I can't go there.

    But good luck on your test! From experience, getting the "wheels to turn again", so to speak, after a long sabbatical is going to be tough. But it takes just one day of classes for you to get the ball rolling again. Let me know how it goes for you. :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. hello ms. stef! is it okay if ngayon pa lang ako mgstastart mgreview?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I guess you'll find out once you get the results to your NMAT. :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. HI I AM WORKING AS DIRECTOR OF NURSING HERE AT USA. I AM USA CITIZEN AND 37 YEARS OLD AT THE MOMENT BUT I AM STILL PLANNING TO GET TO MED SCHOOL THERE IN THE PHILIPPINES. I DO NOT KNOW HOW AND WHERE I WILL START SINCE I GOT MY BSN 1995.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I don't know all the admission requirements, either. You should ask the school where you want to enrol; that way, they can advise you about admission procedures. :) Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  14. hello dr. stef, RN din po ako.. ilang years pa po if mag doctor po ako?. I'm 25 years old na po. Old n po ba ako para mag aral ng doctor?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Define "old". :)

    What I'm saying is, only you can say if you're "too old" to take up medicine. Med school (including clerkship - or what other institutions call junior internship) is four years. After that, you will go into senior internship for one year. Then, you will be reviewing for a few months in preparation for your board exams. After that, you will take up residency for three to five years, depending on the specialization. Then, you will take your oral and written exams. You can then take additional training for another two years.

    Again, the length of your medical studies will depend on how further along you want to get. To specialize, you will spend about 9 to 10 more years after college (minimum). Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi! I'm taking the NMAT this coming December, and I just wanted to say thank you for writing this blog post! :) It's really helpful! :D

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hello! I'm an incoming senior student but I wish to go to med school after finishing my degree in Political Science and I know it's not even a premed course lol. Can I possibly take the NMAT despite my unrelated undergrad? Or do I still have to get a second degree? Hoping for your response doctor. Thanks for reading this! :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi, Crystal! It's not your pre-med course that counts; it's the units and subjects you took. In my time, I had to take extra credits for biology and physics because my pre-med course, Nursing, lacked enough credits for med school - but I hear that that's not even necessary anymore!

    Just to be sure, I'd love for you to check with the school/ university you want to enrol in and ask if they accept all college graduates and do not necessitate extra credits from non-medical courses. Don't just take my word for it; I'm not affiliated with any admissions committee, after all. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi, your blog was really helpful. thank you.

    - I am going to take this year's NMAT, unfortunately it is already scheduled on November 24. So, I have 2 more months to prepare. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Make the two months count, Keil! Two months can be more than enough. It's not just about studying hard; it's also about studying smart. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Dra. Stef! I'll be taking the NMAT this coming November, and I am really anxious about it. But still, I hope that everything goes well for me because I am really preparing for it. Thank you for all of your tips!

    God Bless You and may you continue to inspire a lot of people (Because I am one of those. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  22. That's so nice of you to say, Abigael! Best of luck to you in next year's NMAT! Others will be taking it in 21 days - the countdown has begun for this year's NMAT. :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. I just want to ask, is there a time limit per sub-test in part 1 or you can manage your time as long as you can finish the whole test in 3 hours?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Thank you so much for your tips, Dra. Stef. I am very much inspired right now. I wish I have read your article earlier though :D God bless you po ^_^

    ReplyDelete
  25. Kristin, may your inspiration last your entire career as a (future) doctor! :) Best of luck!

    ReplyDelete
  26. HOW IF YOU HAVE REGISTERED AND PAID BUT THEN YOU WEREN'T ABLE TO TAKE THE SAID EXAM.. THEN YOU APPLIED THE SECOND TIME.. WILL YOUR SCORE ON THE FIRST APPLICATION WHERE YOU DIDN'T TAKE CONSIDERED ZERO AND THIS WILL AFFECT YOUR SECOND TAKE SCORE JUST IN CASE YOU PASSED..THANK YOU MISS STEF

    ReplyDelete
  27. I'M GLAD I CAME ACROSS YOUR ARTICLE TODAY! YOU'RE A LIFE (AND CAREER) SAVER!

    Been working in the BPO Industry for five years and finally answered the calling of my childhood dream to become a doctor. Will take the NMAT on my own time because I am studying every single day to get back on track. it's been a while since I opened a book. lol.

    Wishing you could post scholarship programs also offered by private sectors (on top of those offered in schools) for aspiring med students.Thanks in advance for reading (or replying) and godbless! :3

    ReplyDelete
  28. Marion, it's tough getting the ball rolling again, is it not? :) Hard, but definitely not impossible!

    Unfortunately, I don't know of any scholarship programs from private sectors. If I did, I would have applied years ago! :) But good luck on your search and may you find the path that makes you most fulfilled.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Lea-an, sorry for the late reply - the notification for your comment got buried under other messages in my rather haphazard inbox. :)

    Anyway, with regards to your NMAT scores, they may not average them at all. However, they will ask you how many times you've taken the test. You don't want to lie to them because they might (and will) find out, so it's best to do good on the first try.

    On the other hand, you can tell the medical school of your choice that even though you weren't prepared the first time, you weren't discouraged and you pushed forward. That might earn you extra points for perseverance and determination!

    Good luck, Lea-an! I hope that my silly words here on my blog have helped you. :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi, Praning. Nice nickname, by the way. :)

    Good question. Unfortunately, I can't remember! Maybe it's something you should ask CME - they are the ones in charge of the exams. Try to Google their website. Good luck! Let me know what you dig up.

    ReplyDelete
  31. i am shiva krishna from india already graguated from india in bachelor of physiotherapy , now i came to manila to do my md here so i want help from u so tht i can easily pass the nmat exam easily can u plz guide me hw to read the topics in nmat and where i can get the books for reading nmat can any one teach the lectuers of nmat ? in november i am gng to take the exam fr frist time so help me mam to clear out the exam i think u will look into in this matter

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hello Ms Stef! Im currently a first yr BS Bio student, I just would like to know some tips that can help me in NMAT? I know that its too early to prepare but I really want to take seriously the test.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi, Tyra! There are many NMAT tips in this blog - simply use the search function near the top of the page (right side) and search for "NMAT".

    Here's another tip: While asking questions is important, using what's already in front of you is also important - so find out what you've got! For instance, you asked for NMAT tips but they're all on this blog. If I hadn't answered, you wouldn't have found out - and that's too bad, right?

    I hope that serves as an opportunity to learn something. Your life in med school will be about initiative and research, so I hope you focus on developing initiative and research skills while also studying hard. Best of luck to you!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Hi Dr. Stef! This article is so affirmative for me. I realised that I really want to be a doctor and an exceptional one. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck, Josef! Do let me know if you decide to pursue your dream. I love hearing stories from the students who reach out to me. Stay connected with me on Instagram, okay? Cheers to you!

      Delete

Get Email Updates! (You don't wanna miss out, yes?)